Michigan residents may understand the challenges that come with having a dog in a co-op. Even if the dog is allowed to be there, it still has to fit in with other animals and humans. The process of deciding whether an animal is a good fit for a co-op may be largely subjective. However, this doesn’t necessarily need to be the case.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) has come up with a test that can help determine a dog’s fitness in a co-op environment. This Canine Good Citizenship test requires a dog to walk on a leash without pulling, sit and stay on command and show a willingness to be handled by a vet. There are currently 75 certified instructors who conduct 2,500 tests annually. While there is no guarantee that a dog with such certification will be approved, it is a good first step.

The test indicates that the new resident is trying to do what is good for the entire community. Furthermore, it shows that the dog is social and unlikely to be a threat to others in the community. In addition to the Canine Good Citizenship certification, renters or buyers may also craft resumes that could be used during a pet interview.

As a general rule, co-op boards generally have the power to regulate whether an animal is allowed on the premises or not. If an individual disagrees with a ruling or feels that a board member acted out of line, it may be possible to challenge the decision. An attorney could help a client gather evidence that can be used when interacting with a board about issues with animals or any other problems.